Experiential Gardener

@rebbarham Active 6 months, 3 weeks ago
  • Rebecca posted an update in the group Gardening 6 months, 3 weeks ago

    Sweet Basil seedlings emerging. When these have two or three sets of leaves on them, I will lift them from the dirt using a dinner fork (super handy garden tool), and transplant them into the garden and pots to give away to friends. Everyone likes basil.

  • Rebecca posted an update in the group Gardening 6 months, 3 weeks ago

    Heavenly Blue Morning Glory seedlings. The plastic collar is a section from a sports drink bottle. I call them plant moats. They help to protect young seedlings from slugs, snails or other crawling bugs.

  • Rebecca posted an update in the group Gardening 6 months, 3 weeks ago

    Two native varieties of milkweed seeds that were soaked overnight (following the LadyBird Johnson instructions). I was surprised to see that some of the orange milkweed (Tuberosa) seeds sprouted after just an overnight soak!

  • Rebecca posted an update in the group Gardening 6 months, 3 weeks ago

    This is the second step of the LadyBird Johnson instructions for germinating the milkweed seeds that did not already sprout. This step involves putting the pre-soaked seeds in equal amounts of moist perlite and vermiculite and storing in the refrigerator.

  • Rebecca posted an update in the group Gardening 6 months, 3 weeks ago

    I call these cilantro cooking bouquets. It is just some cilantro in a glass of water (vase), that is ready to use for cooking. The cilantro looks a little elongated because the plants are getting close to bolting or producing flowers/seeds.

  • I don’t care for Fruitless Pear trees, but they are pretty when in bloom.

  • Pansies and dianthus on the first day of spring.

  • A Swiss Chard harvest on March 18th. These were boiled for 5 minutes and the water drained (to reduce oxalates). Then they were returned to the pan and sauteed with garlic in olive oil with some red pepper flakes and garbanzo beans (at end).

  • Rebecca posted a new activity comment 7 months ago

    Hi @littled, welcome to the site 😀

  • Rebecca posted a new activity comment 7 months ago

    Hi @gametime7355gmail-com, thanks for joining us 😀

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months ago

    A pretty Gavota tulip. It was nice to see this tulip, since several of them that tried to bloom a few weeks earlier during the Texas snow apocalypse were damaged.

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months ago

    Create ready-to-eat individual salads when you have too much harvest from your garden and want to encourage your family to eat more salads. If you don’t have plastic containers, just put the salad in a zip lock sandwich bag. Then it can be emptied into a bowl when ready to eat.

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months ago

    A few of the tatsoi plants were allowed to bloom for the bees and to make seeds for the next fall/winter garden. The flowers are covered in bees.

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months ago

    The weather has been so warm that my winter lettuce has reached the bolting (making flowers/seeds), point of no return. So, I had to harvest any that had not started to elongate (start to make a flower stalk). I left 2 plants of each variety to make seeds for next year.

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months ago

    One of three baskets of lettuce that was harvested. I love this Garden Collander. It is large, roomy, and vegetables can be washed in it before bringing them into the house. This helps to insure that dirt and bugs stay outside.

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months ago

    Washed lettuce and onions from the March 13th harvest.

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months ago

    Cute little Tom Thumb heads of lettuce from the March 14th harvest.

  • Rebecca posted an update 7 months, 1 week ago

    A bee enjoying a tatsoi flower. I am letting some of the tatsoi flower and make seeds for next fall.

  • The greenery from the Ranunculus dies back to the ground, but will grow back from the tuber as long as the dirt is not too wet. Some people take the tubers out, but long as the soil is not too wet they will not rot.

  • Load More